Community Accountability and Transformative Justice

How are our communities responding to violence and what questions or challenges does this raise for traditional models of responding to domestic violence and sexual assault? Transformative Justice and Community Accountability (TJ/CA) are community-based models to heal from and respond to violence on an individual level while seeking to transform the roots causes that allow that violence to happen. We facilitate workshops on community accountability and transformative justice.

To learn more about TJ/CA please see:

* What is Transformative Justice & Community Accountability (http://www.transformativejustice.eu/?page_id=16)http://communityaccountability.wordpress.com/

* Creative Intervention's Toolkit: A for Practical Guide to Stopping Interpersonal Violence (http://www.creative-interventions.org/tools/toolkit/)

* Generation 5's Towards Transformative Justice (http://www.generationfive.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/G5_Toward_Transformative_Justice-Document.pdf)

* The Revolution Starts At Home (http://revolutionathome.tumblr.com/)

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

On 3-13-14 we hosted a panel to discuss the successes, challenges, gaps and visions for TJ/CA in Seattle.

Recording (mp3 103MB) *please note, the recording cuts out during the final question, about 5 minutes before the panel finishes. Apologies that we don't have these last few minutes of the program.

Transcription (available here: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B-DO_x5TVJG4cElfSHRSOEJlaWM/edit?usp=sharing). Special thanks to Nicole, Pacheena, Jed and Ariel for help transcribing!

Kiyomi Fujikawa (Moderator) is a Seattle-based, gender-fabulous, queer, mixed-race organizer. Kiyomi has been involved with movements to end sexual assault and domestic/dating violence since 2001, and she currently works as the Queer Network Program Coordinator at API Chaya and organizes with a collective of nikkei (people of Japanese descent) folks called Tadaima. In 2013, she participated in the Trans* Justice Funding Project, which distributed over $50,000 to organizations working for liberation for Trans* people and our communities.

Norma Timbang is one of the co-founders of Asian & Pacific Islander Women's Center and a community activist. She has served on the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum's national governing board, National Queer Asian & Pacific Islander Alliance steering and conference committees, Violence Against Women Online Resources' board, the Washington State Task Force on Human Trafficking, and the King County Coalition Against Domestic Violence's board of directors. Currently, Norma is a social worker in private practice and a lecturer at the University of Washington School of Social Work.

Georgena Frazier is a queer poet, cosmetologists, community organizer, and former organizer at CARA (Communities Against Rape and Abuse).  A part of the Ladies First Collective she has worked hard along side others woman of color to create warm welcoming spaces for other people of color in Seattle. Her hope is that as she frees herself through her art, others will see it, hear it, feel it, and go after their own freedom.

Shannon Perez-Darby is a domestic violence advocate, youth worker, and author of an article on self-accountability as a building block for change in the Revolution Starts at Home. Shannon is a queer mixed Latin@ femme very interested in how our daily interactions can lead to revolutionary change.  A former zinester, Shannon has been thinking and writing about issues related to queer and trans communities, anti-violence work and resiliency for over 12 years.

Nathaniel Shara is a queer, South Asian therapist and educator who focuses on healing and transforming the impacts of trauma and oppression. Politicized through queer, feminist and anti-racist activism, he has spent the last ten years working within queer communities of color to practice liberatory interventions around gender-based violence through transformative justice organizing, community based advocacy, and grassroots political education. He is a lead teacher of the year-long Somatics & Trauma program, and is passionate about building loving and accountable power for revolutionary social change.

Billie Rain is a disabled writer, activist and filmmaker.  Years of chronic illness and a rare tumor condition have given hir an amazing sense of groundedness, connection and self-advocacy that fuel hir passion to bring truth, in all its pain and glory, to audiences everywhere. http://dualpowerproductions.com